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cobble1

[kob-uh l] /ˈkɒb əl/
verb (used with object), cobbled, cobbling.
1.
to mend (shoes, boots, etc.); patch.
2.
to put together roughly or clumsily.
Origin of cobble1
1490-1500
1490-1500; apparently back formation from cobbler

cobble2

[kob-uh l] /ˈkɒb əl/
noun
1.
a cobblestone.
2.
cobbles, coal in lumps larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder.
3.
Metalworking.
  1. a defect in a rolled piece resulting from loss of control over its movement.
  2. Slang. a piece showing bad workmanship.
verb (used with object), cobbled, cobbling.
4.
to pave with cobblestones.
Origin
1595-1605; perhaps cob + -le; see cobblestone
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for cobbling
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • We are cobbling up a robe for the Emperor out of mere rags; we are upholsterers and not artists.

    The Emperor, Complete Georg Ebers
  • He had work to finish in the cobbling line; and besides he had no fancy for any bed but his own.

    The Golden Shoemaker J. W. Keyworth
  • The shooting occurred in his cobbling shop, and the gun was found as proof of his crime.

    Rose O'Paradise Grace Miller White
  • When Pelle had eaten he was about to sit down to his cobbling.

    Pelle the Conqueror, Complete Martin Anderson Nexo
  • For Pelle had bidden farewell to cobbling, and was living at home as a landowner's son.

    Pelle the Conqueror, Complete Martin Anderson Nexo
  • Now the cobbler was as patient about fishing as he had been about cobbling.

    The Brown Fairy Book Andrew Lang
  • The Beechams had never thought of doing so, since Grandpa had his cobbling and Daddy his photograph finishing.

    Across the Fruited Plain Florence Crannell Means
  • Others took to cobbling, and had plenty to do to keep our boots in order.

    A Kut Prisoner H. C. W. Bishop
  • "Now everybody's linked up with everybody else," agreed Grandpa, cobbling a shoe with his little kit.

    Across the Fruited Plain Florence Crannell Means
British Dictionary definitions for cobbling

cobble1

/ˈkɒbəl/
noun
1.
short for cobblestone
2.
(geology) a rock fragment, often rounded, with a diameter of 64–256 mm and thus smaller than a boulder but larger than a pebble
verb
3.
(transitive) to pave (a road) with cobblestones
See also cobbles
Derived Forms
cobbled, adjective
Word Origin
C15 (in cobblestone): from cob1

cobble2

/ˈkɒbəl/
verb (transitive)
1.
to make or mend (shoes)
2.
to put together clumsily
Word Origin
C15: back formation from cobbler1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cobbling

cobble

n.

"paving stone; worn, rounded stone," c.1600, earlier cobblestone, probably a diminutive of cob in some sense. The verb in this sense is from 1690s. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.

v.

"to mend clumsily," late 15c., perhaps a back-formation from cobbler (n.1), or from cob, via a notion of lumps. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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cobbling in Science
cobble
  (kŏb'əl)   
A rock fragment larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder. Pebbles have a diameter between 64 and 256 mm (2.56 and 10.24 inches) and are often rounded.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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