cog

1 [kog, kawg]
noun
1.
(not in technical use) a gear tooth, formerly especially one of hardwood or metal, fitted into a slot in a gearwheel of less durable material.
2.
3.
a person who plays a minor part in a large organization, activity, etc.: He's just a small cog in the financial department.
verb (used without object), cogged, cogging.
4.
(of an electric motor) to move jerkily.
verb (used with object), cogged, cogging.
5.
to roll or hammer (an ingot) into a bloom or slab.
Idioms
6.
slip a cog, to make a blunder; err: One of the clerks must have slipped a cog.

Origin:
1200–50; Middle English cogge, probably < Scandinavian; compare Swedish, Norwegian kugg cog

Dictionary.com Unabridged

cog

2 [kog, kawg]
verb (used with object), cogged, cogging.
1.
to manipulate or load (dice) unfairly.
verb (used without object), cogged, cogging.
2.
to cheat, especially at dice.

Origin:
1525–35; origin uncertain

cog

3 [kog, kawg]
noun
1.
Carpentry. (in a cogged joint) the tongue in one timber, fitting into a corresponding slot in another.
2.
Mining. a cluster of timber supports for a roof. Compare chock ( def 4 ).
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), cogged, cogging.
3.
Carpentry. to join with a cog.

Origin:
1855–60; special use of cog1; replacing cock in same sense, special use of cock1 (in sense of projection); see coak

cog.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
cog1 (kɒɡ)
 
n
1.  any of the teeth or projections on the rim of a gearwheel or sprocket
2.  a gearwheel, esp a small one
3.  a person or thing playing a small part in a large organization or process
 
vb , cogs, cogging, cogged
4.  (tr) metallurgy to roll (cast-steel ingots) to convert them into blooms
 
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish kogge, Swedish kugge, Norwegian kug]

cog2 (kɒɡ)
 
vb , cogs, cogging, cogged
slang to cheat (in a game, esp dice), as by loading a dice
 
[C16: originally a dice-playing term, of unknown origin]

cog3 (kɒɡ)
 
n
1.  a tenon that projects from the end of a timber beam for fitting into a mortise
 
vb , cogs, cogging, cogged
2.  (tr) to join (pieces of wood) with cogs
 
[C19: of uncertain origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cog
"tooth on a wheel," mid-13c., probably a borrowing from a Scandinavian language (cf. Norwegian kugg "cog").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
cog.
cognate
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

cog

In addition to the idiom beginning with cog, also see slip a cog.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
Because of public transportation, such as a cog railway, getting there is part of the fun.
In the new organization, the worker is no longer a cog in the machine but is an intelligent part of the overall process.
When the gas giants of our system are together on the same side of their solar orbits, the sun moves away from the cog.
If necessary, try yoga, or cog therapy to keep the physiological responses at
  healthy levels.
Idioms & Phrases
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