follow Dictionary.com

Yours, Etc.: Origins and Uses of 8 Sign-Offs

collimate

[kol-uh-meyt] /ˈkɒl əˌmeɪt/
verb (used with object), collimated, collimating.
1.
to bring into line; make parallel.
2.
to adjust accurately the line of sight of (a telescope).
Origin
1615-1625
1615-25; < Latin collimātus, misreading of collineātus, past participle of collineāre to direct in a straight line, equivalent to col- col-1 + -lineā-, verbal derivative of linea line1 + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
collimation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for collimations

collimate

/ˈkɒlɪˌmeɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to adjust the line of sight of (an optical instrument)
2.
to use a collimator on (a beam of radiation or particles)
3.
to make parallel or bring into line
Derived Forms
collimation, noun
Word Origin
C17: from New Latin collimāre, erroneously for Latin collīneāre to aim, from com- (intensive) + līneāre, from līnea line
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for collimations

16
0
Scrabble Words With Friends