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colored

[kuhl-erd] /ˈkʌl ərd/
adjective
1.
having color.
2.
Older Use: Offensive. belonging wholly or in part to any group of nonwhite people, especially to black people.
3.
Older Use: Offensive. pertaining to black people.
4.
influenced or biased:
colored opinions.
5.
specious; deceptive:
The authorities detected a colored quality in her statement.
6.
Botany. of some hue other than green.
noun
7.
Older Use: Offensive.
  1. a black person.
  2. the colored, black people as a group.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English; see color, -ed3
Related forms
half-colored, adjective
uncolored, adjective
uncoloredly, adverb
uncoloredness, noun
undercolored, adjective
well-colored, adjective
Usage note
2, 3, 7. See black.

color

[kuhl-er] /ˈkʌl ər/
noun
1.
the quality of an object or substance with respect to light reflected by the object, usually determined visually by measurement of hue, saturation, and brightness of the reflected light; saturation or chroma; hue.
2.
the natural appearance of the skin, especially of the face; complexion:
She has a lovely color.
3.
a ruddy complexion:
The wind and sun had given color to the sailor's face.
4.
a blush:
His remarks brought the color to her face.
5.
vivid or distinctive quality, as of a literary work:
Melville's description of a whaling voyage is full of color.
6.
details in description, customs, speech, habits, etc., of a place or period:
The novel takes place in New Orleans and contains much local color.
7.
something that is used for coloring; pigment; paint; tint; dye.
8.
background information, as anecdotes about players or competitors or analyses of plays, strategy, or performance, given by a sportscaster to heighten interest in a sportscast.
9.
colors.
  1. any distinctive color or combination or pattern of colors, especially of a badge, ribbon, uniform, or the like, worn or displayed as a symbol of or to identify allegiance to, membership in, or sponsorship by a school, group, or organization.
  2. nature, viewpoint, or attitude; character; personality:
    His behavior in a crisis revealed his true colors.
  3. a flag, ensign, etc., particularly the national flag.
  4. U.S. Navy. the ceremony of hoisting the national flag at 8 a.m. and of lowering it at sunset.
10.
skin complexion of a particular people or ethnic group, especially when other than white: a person of color; people of color; a man of color; alumni of color; children of color.
11.
outward appearance or aspect; guise or show:
It was a lie, but it had the color of the truth.
12.
a pretext:
She did it under the color of doing a good deed.
13.
Painting. the general use or effect of the pigments in a picture.
14.
Phonetics, timbre.
15.
Chiefly Law. an apparent or prima facie right or ground:
to hold possession under color of title.
16.
Music. tone color.
17.
a trace or particle of valuable mineral, especially gold, as shown by washing auriferous gravel.
18.
Physics. any of the labels red, green, or blue that designate the three states in which quarks are expected to exist, or any of the corresponding labels for antiquark states.
19.
Printing. the amount of ink used.
20.
Heraldry. a tincture other than a fur or metal, usually including gules, azure, vert, sable, and purpure.
adjective
21.
involving, utilizing, yielding, or possessing color:
a color TV.
verb (used with object)
22.
to give or apply color to; tinge; paint; dye:
She colored her hair dark red.
23.
to cause to appear different from the reality:
In order to influence the jury, he colored his account of what had happened.
24.
to give a special character or distinguishing quality to:
His personal feelings color his writing.
verb (used without object)
25.
to take on or change color:
The ocean colored at dawn.
26.
to flush; blush:
He colored when confronted with the incriminating evidence.
Idioms
27.
call to the colors, to summon for service in the armed forces:
Thousands are being called to the colors.
28.
change color,
  1. to blush as from embarrassment.
  2. to turn pale, as from fear:
    When he saw the size of his opponent, he changed color.
29.
with flying colors. flying colors.
Also, especially British, colour.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English col(o)ur < Anglo-French (French couleur) < Latin colōr- (stem of color) hue
Related forms
colorer, noun
overcolor, verb
precolor, noun, verb
recolor, verb (used with object)
transcolor, adjective
undercolor, noun
Can be confused
color, hue, shade, tint (see synonym study at shade)
Synonyms
23. bias, twist.
Usage note
See black.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for colored
  • The water then becomes cloudy, colored a shade of green, yellow, brown, or red.
  • Sprinkles are small firm pieces of sugar and oils that are colored with food coloring.
  • The bag or syringe is partially filled with icing which is sometimes colored.
  • Man with a colored pet ferret wearing a red collar on his shoulder.
  • The view wavers all over the place, and enemies and items are just colored silhouettes.
  • For this function, they are brightly colored and move in a pulsating fashion.
  • These are mall stream breeding frogs with irises colored bright red, bronze or yellow.
  • Every human thought and deed is colored by sin and sinful motives.
  • This cinema shares release was the only one of the to have their lobby cards colored.
  • Ideal for printing darker inks onto lighter colored garments.
British Dictionary definitions for colored

color

/ˈkʌlə/
noun, verb
1.
the US spelling of colour
Derived Forms
colorable, adjective
colorer, noun
colorful, adjective
coloring, noun
colorist, noun
colorless, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for colored
adj.

late 14c., past participle adjective from color (v.); in reference to "non-white skin," 1610s.

color

n.

early 13c., "skin color, complexion," from Old French color "color, complexion, appearance" (Modern French couleur), from Latin color "color of the skin; color in general, hue; appearance," from Old Latin colos, originally "a covering" (akin to celare "to hide, conceal"), from PIE root *kel- "to cover, conceal" (see cell).

For sense evolution, cf. Sanskrit varnah "covering, color," related to vrnoti "covers," and also see chroma. Meaning "visible color, color of something" is attested in English from c.1300. As "color as a property of things," from late 14c. Old English words for "color" were hiw ("hue"), bleo.

v.

late 14c.; see color (n.); earliest use is figurative. Related: Colored; coloring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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colored in Medicine

color col·or (kŭl'ər)
n.

  1. That aspect of the appearance of objects and light sources that may be specified in terms of hue, lightness, and saturation.

  2. That portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum specified in terms of wavelength, luminosity, and purity.

  3. The general appearance of the skin.

  4. The skin pigmentation of a person not classified as white.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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colored in Science
color
  (kŭl'ər)   
  1. The sensation produced by the effect of light waves striking the retina of the eye. The color of something depends mainly on which wavelengths of light it emits, reflects, or transmits.

  2. Color charge. See also hadron.


Our Living Language  : When beams of colored light are mixed, or added, their wavelengths combine to form other colors. All spectral colors can be formed by mixing wavelengths corresponding to the additive primaries red, green, and blue. When two of the additive primaries are mixed in equal proportion, they form the complement of the third. Thus cyan (a mixture of green and blue) is the complement of red; magenta (a mixture of blue and red) is the complement of green; and yellow (a mixture of red and green) is the complement of blue. Mixing the three additive primaries in equal proportions reconstitutes white light. When light passes through a color filter, certain wavelengths are absorbed, or subtracted, while others are transmitted. The subtractive primaries cyan, magenta, and yellow can be combined using overlapping filters to form all other colors. When two of the subtractive primaries are combined in equal proportion, they form the additive primary whose wavelength they share. Thus overlapping filters of cyan (blue and green) and magenta (blue and red) filter out all wavelengths except blue; magenta (blue and red) and yellow (red and green) transmit only red; and yellow (red and green) and cyan (blue and green) transmit only green. Combining all three subtractive primaries in equal proportions filters out all wavelengths, producing black. Light striking a colored surface behaves similarly to light passing through a filter, with certain wavelengths being absorbed and others reflected. Pigments are combined to form different colors by a process of subtractive absorption of various wavelengths.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for colored

color

noun

Interesting background, esp details about players, etc, as used in sports coverage •A scholar in the mid-1920s wrote of color stuff as the enlivening human interest and spicy, inventive language used by sports writers to avoid mere facts: doing color, spoke of a shot put up by one of the players by calling it ''a Perot hook'': in, out, and in/ I told him I need some color for a magazine piece I'm doing (1938+ Media)

Related Terms

off color


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with colored
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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