Try Our Apps


Supposedly vs. Supposably


[kuh-men-duh-buh l] /kəˈmɛn də bəl/
worthy of praise:
She did a commendable job of informing all the interested parties.
Related forms
commendableness, noun
commendably, adverb
noncommendable, adjective
noncommendableness, noun
noncommendably, adverb
uncommendable, adjective
uncommendably, adverb Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for commendably
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Mr. Campbell is a stanch democrat and is commendably interested in public affairs, although not an aspirant for office.

  • There are in all 111 observations, most of them commendably brief.

  • France is commendably determined not to let the great industry die.

    The Tapestry Book Helen Churchill Candee
  • His Parliament, however, met him as a matter of fact in a commendably patriotic mood.

    William the Third H. D. Traill
  • Which Work is since commendably continued (but not with equal quickness and judgment,) by Mr. Truffel.

  • The greeting between the Paris friends was commendably calm, but neither seemed to be able to speak freely.

    Hugo Arnold Bennett
  • Abby Atkins was commendably quiet and studious, and when called out to recitation made the best one in her class.

    The Portion of Labor Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • The public school system of St. Louis is one of the best in the country, and its school-houses are commendably fine.

Word Origin and History for commendably



mid-14c., from Middle French commendable, from Latin commendabilis "praiseworthy," from commendare (see commend). Related: Commendably.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for commendably

Scrabble Words With Friends