commiserable

commiserate

[kuh-miz-uh-reyt]
verb (used with object), commiserated, commiserating.
1.
to feel or express sorrow or sympathy for; empathize with; pity.
verb (used without object), commiserated, commiserating.
2.
to sympathize (usually followed by with ): They commiserated with him over the loss of his job.

Origin:
1585–95; < Latin commiserātus (past participle of commiserārī), equivalent to com- com- + miser pitiable (see misery) + -ātus -ate1

commiserable, adjective
commiseration, noun
commiserative, adjective
commiseratively, adverb
commiserator, noun
noncommiseration, noun
noncommiserative, adjective
noncommiseratively, adverb
uncommiserated, adjective
uncommiserating, adjective
uncommiserative, adjective
uncommiseratively, adverb

commensurate, commiserate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To commiserable
Collins
World English Dictionary
commiserate (kəˈmɪzəˌreɪt)
 
vb (when intr, usually foll by with)
to feel or express sympathy or compassion (for)
 
[C17: from Latin commiserārī, from com- together + miserārī to bewail, pity, from miser wretched]
 
com'miserable
 
adj
 
commise'ration
 
n
 
com'miserative
 
adj
 
com'miseratively
 
adv
 
com'miserator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

commiserate
c.1600, from L. commiseratus, pp. of commiserari (see commiseration). Related: Commiserating (1630s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;