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commiserate

[kuh-miz-uh-reyt] /kəˈmɪz əˌreɪt/
verb (used with object), commiserated, commiserating.
1.
to feel or express sorrow or sympathy for; empathize with; pity.
verb (used without object), commiserated, commiserating.
2.
to sympathize (usually followed by with):
They commiserated with him over the loss of his job.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; < Latin commiserātus (past participle of commiserārī), equivalent to com- com- + miser pitiable (see misery) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
commiserable, adjective
commiseration, noun
commiserative, adjective
commiseratively, adverb
commiserator, noun
noncommiseration, noun
noncommiserative, adjective
noncommiseratively, adverb
uncommiserated, adjective
uncommiserating, adjective
uncommiserative, adjective
uncommiseratively, adverb
Can be confused
commensurate, commiserate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for commiserating
  • If you find yourself commiserating about dieting difficulties over your third beer, suggest meeting for coffee instead.
  • It is an unusual situation, and both admit to commiserating occasionally.
  • No amount of commiserating by a collection of literature professors will change that.
  • The audience is thrilled at the possibilities, but behind the podium the members are sweating and commiserating among themselves.
  • Between his sneezes and coughing he indulged in many commiserating groans and some profanity.
  • The buffaloes, as if commiserating their bovine neighbors, licked their faces and in other ways showed their good feeling.
  • Two former heavyweight champions have been commiserating with each other since suffering major setbacks.
British Dictionary definitions for commiserating

commiserate

/kəˈmɪzəˌreɪt/
verb
1.
when intr, usually foll by with. to feel or express sympathy or compassion (for)
Derived Forms
commiserable, adjective
commiseration, noun
commiserative, adjective
commiseratively, adverb
commiserator, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin commiserārī, from com- together + miserārī to bewail, pity, from miser wretched
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for commiserating
commiserate
c.1600, from L. commiseratus, pp. of commiserari (see commiseration). Related: Commiserating (1630s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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20
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