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compromis

[kom-pruh-mee] /ˈkɒm prəˌmi/
noun, plural compromises
[kom-pruh-meez] /ˈkɒm prəˌmiz/ (Show IPA).
International Law.
1.
a formal document, executed in common by nations submitting a dispute to arbitration, that defines the matter at issue, the rules of procedure and the powers of the arbitral tribunal, and the principles for determining the award.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; < French: literally, compromise

compromise

[kom-pruh-mahyz] /ˈkɒm prəˌmaɪz/
noun
1.
a settlement of differences by mutual concessions; an agreement reached by adjustment of conflicting or opposing claims, principles, etc., by reciprocal modification of demands.
2.
the result of such a settlement.
3.
something intermediate between different things:
The split-level is a compromise between a ranch house and a multistoried house.
4.
an endangering, especially of reputation; exposure to danger, suspicion, etc.:
a compromise of one's integrity.
verb (used with object), compromised, compromising.
5.
to settle by a compromise.
6.
to expose or make vulnerable to danger, suspicion, scandal, etc.; jeopardize:
a military oversight that compromised the nation's defenses.
7.
Obsolete.
  1. to bind by bargain or agreement.
  2. to bring to terms.
verb (used without object), compromised, compromising.
8.
to make a compromise or compromises:
The conflicting parties agreed to compromise.
9.
to make a dishonorable or shameful concession:
He is too honorable to compromise with his principles.
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English < Anglo-French compromisse, Middle French compromis < Latin comprōmissum. See com-, promise
Related forms
compromiser, noun
compromisingly, adverb
compromissary
[kom-prom-uh-ser-ee] /kɒmˈprɒm əˌsɛr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
noncompromising, adjective
procompromise, adjective
quasi-compromising, adjective
quasi-compromisingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for compromises
  • Impossible compromises between two possible alternatives.
  • Indeed there must be these compromises, or miracles.
  • It made compromises with spoils politics, and they were wretched failures.
  • Those lines and colors, so clear and confident on the final product, reflect a host of difficult choices and compromises.
  • Short trips needn't be quickly forgotten travel compromises.
  • The discussion produced no compromises-it was a debate, not a negotiation-but it was clarifying.
  • He disparages compromises and balancing tests and incremental solutions.
  • But those tweaks can come with compromises: jerky motions and abrupt shifts in low-speed driving.
  • Due to its evolutionary history, the brain shows compromises in its structures.
  • It can be partially contained, and temporary compromises have been found, but conflict is ultimately inevitable.
British Dictionary definitions for compromises

compromise

/ˈkɒmprəˌmaɪz/
noun
1.
settlement of a dispute by concessions on both or all sides
2.
the terms of such a settlement
3.
something midway between two or more different things
4.
an exposure of one's good name, reputation, etc, to injury
verb
5.
to settle (a dispute) by making concessions
6.
(transitive) to expose (a person or persons) to disrepute
7.
(transitive) to prejudice unfavourably; weaken: his behaviour compromised his chances
8.
(transitive) (obsolete) to pledge mutually
Derived Forms
compromiser, noun
compromisingly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Old French compromis, from Latin comprōmissum mutual agreement to accept the decision of an arbiter, from comprōmittere, from prōmittere to promise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for compromises

compromise

n.

early 15c., "a joint promise to abide by an arbiter's decision," from Middle French compromis (13c.), from Latin compromissus, past participle of compromittere "to make a mutual promise" (to abide by the arbiter's decision), from com- "together" (see com-) + promittere (see promise). The main modern sense of "a coming to terms" is from extension to the settlement itself (late 15c.).

v.

mid-15c., from compromise (n.). Related: Compromised; compromising.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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