concede

[kuhn-seed]
verb (used with object), conceded, conceding.
1.
to acknowledge as true, just, or proper; admit: He finally conceded that she was right.
2.
to acknowledge (an opponent's victory, score, etc.) before it is officially established: to concede an election before all the votes are counted.
3.
to grant as a right or privilege; yield: to concede a longer vacation for all employees.
verb (used without object), conceded, conceding.
4.
to make concession; yield; admit: She was so persistent that I conceded at last.

Origin:
1625–35; < Latin concēdere, equivalent to con- con- + cēdere to withdraw, yield, cede

concededly, adverb
conceder, noun
concessible, adjective
preconcede, verb (used with object), preconceded, preconceding.
unconceded, adjective
unconceding, adjective
well-conceded, adjective

1. accede, concede, exceed ; 2. cede, concede, secede, seed.


1. grant.


1. deny. 3. refuse.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
concede (kənˈsiːd)
 
vb
1.  (when tr, may take a clause as object) to admit or acknowledge (something) as true or correct
2.  to yield or allow (something, such as a right)
3.  (tr) to admit as certain in outcome: to concede an election
 
[C17: from Latin concēdere, from cēdere to give way, cede]
 
con'cededly
 
adv
 
con'ceder
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

concede
1630s, from L. concedere "give way, yield," from com-, intensive prefix, + cedere "to go, grant, give way" (see cede). Related: Conceded (pp. adj., 1640s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
No one would be willing to concede the latter qualification and few the former.
But it is almost impossible, federal officials concede, to protect them from
  encroachment.
Yet even oil optimists concede that physical limits are beginning to loom.
Consensus similar to concession which means to concede not necessarily agree
  think about it.
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