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concede

[kuh n-seed] /kənˈsid/
verb (used with object), conceded, conceding.
1.
to acknowledge as true, just, or proper; admit:
He finally conceded that she was right.
2.
to acknowledge (an opponent's victory, score, etc.) before it is officially established:
to concede an election before all the votes are counted.
3.
to grant as a right or privilege; yield:
to concede a longer vacation for all employees.
verb (used without object), conceded, conceding.
4.
to make concession; yield; admit:
She was so persistent that I conceded at last.
Origin
1625-1635
1625-35; < Latin concēdere, equivalent to con- con- + cēdere to withdraw, yield, cede
Related forms
concededly, adverb
conceder, noun
concessible, adjective
preconcede, verb (used with object), preconceded, preconceding.
unconceded, adjective
unconceding, adjective
well-conceded, adjective
Can be confused
accede, concede, exceed.
cede, concede, secede, seed.
Synonyms
1. grant.
Antonyms
1. deny. 3. refuse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for concede
  • No one would be willing to concede the latter qualification and few the former.
  • But it is almost impossible, federal officials concede, to protect them from encroachment.
  • Yet even oil optimists concede that physical limits are beginning to loom.
  • Consensus similar to concession which means to concede not necessarily agree think about it.
  • We concede that a mission statement may only rarely influence action on a campus.
  • concede that you have written for a specialized audience.
  • But he does concede that one of his critics is right.
  • Clifford will concede, in the abstract, to abuses in the for-profit industry.
  • All three of these studies concede that graduation rates aren't the final word in college accountability.
  • Even monorail's critics concede that, because it weighs less, it can be elevated less expensively than rail.
British Dictionary definitions for concede

concede

/kənˈsiːd/
verb
1.
(when transitive, may take a clause as object) to admit or acknowledge (something) as true or correct
2.
to yield or allow (something, such as a right)
3.
(transitive) to admit as certain in outcome to concede an election
Derived Forms
concededly, adverb
conceder, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin concēdere, from cēdere to give way, cede
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for concede
v.

1630s, from Middle French concéder or directly from Latin concedere "give way, yield, go away, depart, retire," figuratively "agree, consent, give precedence," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + cedere "to go, grant, give way" (see cede). Related: Conceded; conceding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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