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[kon-kokt, kuh n-] /kɒnˈkɒkt, kən-/
verb (used with object)
to prepare or make by combining ingredients, especially in cookery:
to concoct a meal from leftovers.
to devise; make up; contrive:
to concoct an excuse.
Origin of concoct
1525-35; < Latin concoctus (past participle of concoquere to cook together), equivalent to con- con- + coc-, variant stem of coquere to boil, cook1 (akin to Greek péptein; see pepsin, peptic) + -tus past participle ending
Related forms
concocter, concoctor, noun
concoctive, adjective
well-concocted, adjective
2. invent, fabricate, hatch. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for concocting
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The girls employed themselves very usefully in concocting new articles of clothing out of old materials.

  • Who could have supposed that all this time Tiresias was concocting an epigram on Pluto!

    The Infernal Marriage Benjamin Disraeli
  • Well, my fat friend, what wicked scandal do you come fresh from concocting?

    The Hypocrite Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull
  • He aided the king as much as he could in making his arrangements and in concocting all his plans.

    Richard I Jacob Abbott
  • And he rambled on in his mind, concocting an educational scheme which would really fit a man for the wear and tear of life.

    Davenport Dunn, Volume 2 (of 2) Charles James Lever
British Dictionary definitions for concocting


verb (transitive)
to make by combining different ingredients
to invent; make up; contrive
Derived Forms
concocter, concoctor, noun
concoctive, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Latin concoctus cooked together, from concoquere, from coquere to cook
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for concocting



1530s, "to digest," from Latin concoctus, past participle of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from com- "together" (see com-) + coquere "to cook" (see cook (n.)). Meaning "to prepare an edible thing" is from 1670s. First expanded metaphorically beyond cooking 1792. Related: Concocted; concocting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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