Condemningly

condemn

[kuhn-dem]
verb (used with object)
1.
to express an unfavorable or adverse judgment on; indicate strong disapproval of; censure.
2.
to pronounce to be guilty; sentence to punishment: to condemn a murderer to life imprisonment.
3.
to give grounds or reason for convicting or censuring: His acts condemn him.
4.
to judge or pronounce to be unfit for use or service: to condemn an old building.
5.
U.S. Law. to acquire ownership of for a public purpose, under the right of eminent domain: The city condemned the property.
6.
to force into a specific state or activity: His lack of education condemned him to a life of menial jobs.
7.
to declare incurable.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English condempnen < Anglo-French, Old French condem(p)ner < Latin condemnāre. See con-, damn

condemnable [kuhn-dem-nuh-buhl] , adjective
condemnably, adverb
condemner [kuhn-dem-er] , condemnor [kuhn-dem-er, kuhn-dem-nawr] , noun
condemningly, adverb
recondemn, verb (used with object)
self-condemned, adjective
self-condemning, adjective
uncondemnable, adjective
uncondemned, adjective
uncondemning, adjective
uncondemningly, adverb

1. blame, censure, condemn (see synonym study at blame) ; 2. condemn, contemn.


1. See blame.


2. exonerate, liberate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
condemn (kənˈdɛm)
 
vb
1.  to express strong disapproval of; censure
2.  to pronounce judicial sentence on
3.  to demonstrate the guilt of: his secretive behaviour condemned him
4.  to judge or pronounce unfit for use: that food has been condemned
5.  to compel or force into a particular state or activity: his disposition condemned him to boredom
 
[C13: from Old French condempner, from Latin condemnāre, from damnāre to condemn; see damn]
 
condemnable
 
adj
 
con'demnably
 
adv
 
condem'nation
 
n
 
con'demner
 
n
 
con'demningly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

condemn
c.1300, from O.Fr. condemner, from L. condemnare, from com- intensive prefix + damnare "to harm, damage." Replaced O.E. fordeman.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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