Condonable

condone

[kuhn-dohn]
verb (used with object), condoned, condoning.
1.
to disregard or overlook (something illegal, objectionable, or the like).
2.
to give tacit approval to: By his silence, he seemed to condone their behavior.
3.
to pardon or forgive (an offense); excuse.
4.
to cause the condonation of.
5.
Law. to forgive or act so as to imply forgiveness of (a violation of the marriage vow).

Origin:
1615–25, but in general currency from its use in the British Divorce Act of 1857 (see def. 5); < Latin condōnāre to absolve, grant pardon, equivalent to con- con- + dōnāre to give; see donate

condonable, adjective
condoner, noun
uncondoned, adjective
uncondoning, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
condone (kənˈdəʊn)
 
vb
1.  to overlook or forgive (an offence)
2.  law (esp of a spouse) to pardon or overlook (an offence, usually adultery)
 
[C19: from Latin condōnāre to remit a debt, from com- (intensive) + dōnāre to donate]
 
con'donable
 
adj
 
condonation
 
n
 
con'doner
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

condone
1857, from L. condonare "to give up, remit," from com- intensive prefix + donare "to give" (see donation). Originally a legal term in the Matrimonial Causes Act, which made divorce a civil matter in Britain.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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