confidences

confidence

[kon-fi-duhns]
noun
1.
full trust; belief in the powers, trustworthiness, or reliability of a person or thing: We have every confidence in their ability to succeed.
2.
belief in oneself and one's powers or abilities; self-confidence; self-reliance; assurance: His lack of confidence defeated him.
3.
certitude; assurance: He described the situation with such confidence that the audience believed him completely.
4.
a confidential communication: to exchange confidences.
5.
(especially in European politics) the wish to retain an incumbent government in office, as shown by a vote in a particular issue: a vote of confidence.
6.
presumption; impudence: Her disdainful look crushed the confidence of the brash young man.
7.
Archaic. something that gives confidence; ground of trust.
Idioms
8.
in confidence, as a secret or private matter, not to be divulged or communicated to others; with belief in a person's sense of discretion: I told him in confidence.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin confīdentia. See confide, -ence

hyperconfidence, noun
nonconfidence, noun
superconfidence, noun


1. faith, reliance, dependence. See trust. 2. Confidence, assurance both imply a faith in oneself. Confidence may imply trust in oneself or arrogant self-conceit. Assurance implies even more sureness of oneself; this may be shown as undisturbed calm or as offensive boastfulness.


1. mistrust.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
confidence (ˈkɒnfɪdəns)
 
n
1.  a feeling of trust in a person or thing: I have confidence in his abilities
2.  belief in one's own abilities; self-assurance
3.  trust or a trustful relationship: take me into your confidence
4.  something confided or entrusted; secret
5.  in confidence as a secret

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

confidence
c.1430, from L. confidentia, from confidentem, prp. of confidere "to have full trust or reliance," from con-, intensive prefix, + fidere "to trust" (see faith). For sense of "swindle" see con (3).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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