confidential

[kon-fi-den-shuhl]
adjective
1.
spoken, written, acted on, etc., in strict privacy or secrecy; secret: a confidential remark.
2.
indicating confidence or intimacy; imparting private matters: a confidential tone of voice.
3.
having another's trust or confidence; entrusted with secrets or private affairs: a confidential secretary.
4.
a.
bearing the classification confidential, usually being above restricted and below secret.
b.
limited to persons authorized to use information, documents, etc., so classified. Compare classification ( def 5 ).

Origin:
1645–55; < Latin confīdenti(a) confidence + -al1

confidentiality, confidentialness, noun
confidentially, adverb
nonconfidential, adjective
nonconfidentially, adverb
nonconfidentialness, noun
nonconfidentiality, noun
quasi-confidential, adjective
quasi-confidentially, adverb


1. restricted, private. 2. intimate, familiar. 3. trusted, trustworthy, private. See familiar.
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World English Dictionary
confidential (ˌkɒnfɪˈdɛnʃəl)
 
adj
1.  spoken, written, or given in confidence; secret; private
2.  entrusted with another's confidence or secret affairs: a confidential secretary
3.  suggestive of or denoting intimacy: a confidential approach
 
confidenti'ality
 
n
 
confi'dentialness
 
n
 
confi'dentially
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

confidential
1759, from L. confidentia (see confidence) + -al (1). Related: Confidentiality; confidentially.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

confidentiality con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty (kŏn'fĭ-děn'shē-āl'ĭ-tē)
n.
The ethical principle or legal right that a physician or other health professional will hold secret all information relating to a patient, unless the patient gives consent permitting disclosure.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
To lawyers, protecting clients' confidentiality is a cornerstone of the
  practice of law.
The government has a point on the need for some confidentiality.
Before he left, a company staffer demanded that he sign a final confidentiality
  agreement.
Most measures include some clauses to protect confidentiality.
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