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connive

[kuh-nahyv] /kəˈnaɪv/
verb (used without object), connived, conniving.
1.
to cooperate secretly; conspire (often followed by with):
They connived to take over the business.
2.
to avoid noticing something that one is expected to oppose or condemn; give aid to wrongdoing by forbearing to act or speak (usually followed by at):
The policeman connived at traffic violations.
3.
to be indulgent toward something others oppose or criticize (usually followed by at):
to connive at childlike exaggerations.
Origin
1595-1605
1595-1605; (< French conniver) < Latin co(n)nīvēre to close the eyes in sleep, turn a blind eye, equivalent to con- con- + -nīvēre, akin to nictāre to blink (cf. nictitate)
Related forms
conniver, noun
connivingly, adverb
unconnived, adjective
unconniving, adjective
Can be confused
connive, conspire.
Synonyms
1. plan, plot, collude.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for conniving
  • She is a conniving and totally ill-prepared administrator who has absolutely no people.
  • One sees him as a twisted, conniving monster and often depicts him accordingly.
  • Still they continue on until the remaining four and their conniving companion make it to the underground camp.
  • However, his conniving and ill-tempered brother has designs on the throne, and he drugs his sibling shortly before his coronation.
  • In the end, the conniving one atones for her treachery and the two become fast friends.
  • He was also acquitted of knowingly conniving or taking any other action for the purpose of preventing or hampering his departure.
  • Public opinion would, in all probability, demand the punishment of the conniving or cooperating officers.
  • Politicians accused him of political trickery and conniving and came up with excuse after excuse.
  • They are so conniving--They say one thing and do another.
  • It would have made them out to be absolute conniving beasts.
British Dictionary definitions for conniving

connive

/kəˈnaɪv/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to plot together, esp secretly; conspire
2.
(foll by at) (law) to give assent or encouragement (to the commission of a wrong)
Derived Forms
conniver, noun
connivingly, adverb
Word Origin
C17: from French conniver, from Latin connīvēre to blink, hence, leave uncensured; -nīvēre related to nictāre to wink
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for conniving
connive
c.1600, from L. connivere, also conivere "to wink," from com- "together" + base akin to nictare "to wink," from PIE base *knei-gwh- "to bend." Hence, "to wink at (a crime), be secretly privy."
conniving
1783, pp. adj. from connive (q.v.). Earlier in this sense was connivent (1640s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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