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conserve

[v. kuh n-surv; n. kon-surv, kuh n-surv] /v. kənˈsɜrv; n. ˈkɒn sɜrv, kənˈsɜrv/
verb (used with object), conserved, conserving.
1.
to prevent injury, decay, waste, or loss of:
Conserve your strength for the race.
2.
to use or manage (natural resources) wisely; preserve; save:
Conserve the woodlands.
3.
Physics, Chemistry. to hold (a property) constant during an interaction or process:
the interaction conserved linear momentum.
4.
to preserve (fruit) by cooking with sugar or syrup.
noun
5.
Often, conserves. a mixture of several fruits cooked to jamlike consistency with sugar and often garnished with nuts and raisins.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; (v.) Middle English < Latin conservāre to save, preserve, equivalent to con- con- + servāre to watch over, guard (akin to servus slave, servīre to serve); (noun) Middle English < Middle French conserve, noun derivative of conserver < Latin, as above
Related forms
conserver, noun
nonconserving, adjective, noun
self-conserving, adjective
unconserved, adjective
unconserving, adjective
well-conserved, adjective
Synonyms
2. husband, safeguard.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for conserving
  • Water-conserving gardens can be as colorful as any other.
  • The book is packed with practical suggestions for conserving resources.
  • Moisture-conserving thick, typically furry or hairy leaves are lance-shaped.
  • It calls on all citizens for their full support in this task of conserving and developing human resources.
  • One evening last week, the city held a seminar for property owners who are interested in conserving water.
  • When scarce resources become abundant, smart people treat them differently, exploiting them rather than conserving them.
  • Thank you for telling us about these dedicated caregivers and the progress they are making in conserving sea turtles.
  • US zoos are beginning to direct larger portions of their panda funds to conserving the animals in the wild.
  • Efforts to preserve the basin's ancient ruins go hand in hand with conserving one of the world's living treasures.
  • It had an offset saltbox roof and blue clapboard siding and stingy little sash windows that were good for conserving heat.
British Dictionary definitions for conserving

conserve

verb (transitive) (kənˈsɜːv)
1.
to keep or protect from harm, decay, loss, etc
2.
to preserve (a foodstuff, esp fruit) with sugar
noun (ˈkɒnsɜːv; kənˈsɜːv)
3.
a preparation of fruit in sugar, similar to jam but usually containing whole pieces of fruit
Derived Forms
conservable, adjective
conserver, noun
Word Origin
(vb) C14: from Latin conservāre to keep safe, from servāre to save, protect; (n) C14: from Medieval Latin conserva, from Latin conservāre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for conserving

conserve

v.

late 14c., from Old French conserver (9c.), from Latin conservare "to keep, preserve, keep intact, guard," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + servare "keep watch, maintain" (see observe). Related: Conserved; conserving. As a noun (often conserves) from late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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