consonant with

consonant

[kon-suh-nuhnt]
noun
1.
Phonetics.
a.
(in English articulation) a speech sound produced by occluding with or without releasing (p, b; t, d; k, g), diverting (m, n, ng), or obstructing (f, v; s, z, etc.) the flow of air from the lungs (opposed to vowel ).
b.
(in a syllable) any sound other than the sound of greatest sonority in the syllable, as b, r, and g in brig (opposed to sonant ). Compare vowel ( def 1b ).
c.
(in linguistic function) a concept empirically determined as a phonological element in structural contrast with vowel, as the b of be, the w of we, the y, s, and t of yeast, etc.
2.
a letter that usually represents a consonant sound.
adjective
3.
in agreement; agreeable; in accord; consistent (usually followed by to or with ): behavior consonant with his character.
4.
corresponding in sound, as words.
5.
harmonious, as sounds.
6.
Music. constituting a consonance.
7.
Physics. noting or pertaining to sounds exhibiting consonance.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English consona(u)nt (< Anglo-French) < Latin consonant- (stem of consonāns, present participle of consonāre to sound with or together). See con-, sonant

consonantlike, adjective
consonantly, adverb
unconsonant, adjective


3. concordant, congruous, conformant.


6. dissonant.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
consonant (ˈkɒnsənənt)
 
n
1.  a speech sound or letter of the alphabet other than a vowel; a stop, fricative, or continuant
 
adj
2.  (postpositive; foll by with or to) consistent; in agreement
3.  harmonious in tone or sound
4.  music characterized by the presence of a consonance
5.  being or relating to a consonant
 
[C14: from Latin consonāns, from consonāre to sound at the same time, be in harmony, from sonāre to sound]
 
'consonantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

consonant
c.1300, from L. consonantem (nom. consonans), prp. of consonare "to sound together," from com- "with" + sonare, from sonus "sound" (see sound (n.1)). Consonants thought of as sounds that are only produced together with vowels.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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