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constrained

[kuh n-streynd] /kənˈstreɪnd/
adjective
1.
forced, compelled, or obliged:
a constrained confession.
2.
stiff or unnatural; uneasy or embarrassed:
a constrained manner.
Origin
1565-1575
1565-75; constrain + -ed2
Related forms
constrainedly
[kuh n-strey-nid-lee] /kənˈstreɪ nɪd li/ (Show IPA),
adverb
unconstrained, adjective

constrain

[kuh n-streyn] /kənˈstreɪn/
verb (used with object)
1.
to force, compel, or oblige:
He was constrained to admit the offense.
2.
to confine forcibly, as by bonds.
3.
to repress or restrain:
Cold weather constrained the plant's growth.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English constrei(g)nen < Anglo-French, Middle French constrei(g)n- (stem of constreindre) < Latin constringere. See con-, strain1
Related forms
constrainable, adjective
constrainer, noun
constrainingly, adverb
nonconstraining, adjective
unconstrainable, adjective
unconstraining, adjective
Can be confused
coerce, compel, constrain, force, oblige (see synonym study at oblige)
Synonyms
1. coerce. 2. check, bind.
Antonyms
2. free.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for constrained
  • Museum shops seem inspired, rather than constrained by thematic limitations and the budgets of nonprofit organizations.
  • Bank lending is constrained by customer demand and by capital.
  • Another possibility is that the responder chimpanzee did not understand that its choices were constrained by the proposer.
  • The possibilities for neutrinos are less constrained by previous measurements, he says.
  • There are, however, many ways to design successfully within this constrained form.
  • These measures will ultimately mean contraction since the system is constrained by distance.
  • The good news is that he has not been constrained by false modesty and has chosen six of his own pieces for this book.
  • Nearly half the scientists felt constrained by formal controls, such as government regulations and university codes.
  • Animals are generally constrained by the mechanics of size.
  • The first thing you need to know about mosasaur evolution is that the way they swam was constrained by their anatomy.
British Dictionary definitions for constrained

constrained

/kənˈstreɪnd/
adjective
1.
embarrassed, unnatural, or forced a constrained smile
Derived Forms
constrainedly (kənˈstreɪnɪdlɪ) adverb

constrain

/kənˈstreɪn/
verb (transitive)
1.
to compel or force, esp by persuasion, circumstances, etc; oblige
2.
to restrain by or as if by force; confine
Derived Forms
constrainer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French constreindre, from Latin constringere to bind together, from stringere to bind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for constrained
constrain
mid-14c., from stem of O.Fr. constreindre, from L. constringere "to bind together, tie tightly," from com- "together" + stringere "to draw tight" (see strain (v.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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