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contend

[kuh n-tend] /kənˈtɛnd/
verb (used without object)
1.
to struggle in opposition:
to contend with the enemy for control of the port.
2.
to strive in rivalry; compete; vie:
to contend for first prize.
3.
to strive in debate; dispute earnestly:
to contend against falsehood.
verb (used with object)
4.
to assert or maintain earnestly:
He contended that taxes were too high.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English contenden < Anglo-French contendre < Latin contendere to compete, strive, draw tight, equivalent to con- con- + tendere to stretch; see tend1
Related forms
contender, noun
contendingly, adverb
noncontending, adjective
precontend, verb (used without object)
recontend, verb (used without object)
uncontended, adjective
uncontending, adjective
Can be confused
contend, contest.
Synonyms
1. wrestle, grapple, battle, fight. 2. See compete. 3. argue, wrangle. 4. hold, claim.
Antonyms
3. agree.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for contend
  • Each province has a different system and different things to contend with.
  • If nothing had happened, they contend, people would not have remembered the strange behavior.
  • Some people contend that beer may have been the staple of mankind's diet even before bread was invented.
  • The popular definition of a blue moon isn't the only one-and it's one that's based on an editorial error, astronomers contend.
  • People living adjacent to the drilling sites contend trees are being damaged by air pollutants from the drilling process.
  • And as there is no possible advantage in writing it, with contend ready to hand, it is better avoided in the intransitive sense.
  • And some researchers contend that more outdoor time means seeing in better light, focusing farther.
  • The tricky part is when packets from different input lines contend for the same output line.
  • The researchers contend that the adult brain is thus more changeable more quickly than anyone thought.
  • He then must contend with the social mandate that he be suitably educated.
British Dictionary definitions for contend

contend

/kənˈtɛnd/
verb
1.
(intransitive) often foll by with. to struggle in rivalry, battle, etc; vie
2.
to argue earnestly; debate
3.
(transitive; may take a clause as object) to assert or maintain
Derived Forms
contender, noun
contendingly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin contendere to strive, from com- with + tendere to stretch, aim
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for contend
v.

mid-15c., from Old French contendre, from Latin contendere "to stretch out, strive after," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + tendere "to stretch" (see tenet). Related: Contended; contending.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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