conventional

[kuhn-ven-shuh-nl]
adjective
1.
conforming or adhering to accepted standards, as of conduct or taste: conventional behavior.
2.
pertaining to convention or general agreement; established by general consent or accepted usage; arbitrarily determined: conventional symbols.
3.
ordinary rather than different or original: conventional phraseology.
4.
not using, making, or involving nuclear weapons or energy; nonnuclear: conventional warfare.
5.
Art.
a.
in accordance with an accepted manner, model, or tradition.
b.
(of figurative art) represented in a generalized or simplified manner.
6.
of or pertaining to a convention, agreement, or compact.
7.
Law. resting on consent, express or implied.
8.
of or pertaining to a convention or assembly.

Origin:
1575–85; < Late Latin conventiōnālis. See convention, -al1

conventionalist, noun
conventionally, adverb
anticonventional, adjective
anticonventionally, adverb
anticonventionalist, noun, adjective
nonconventional, adjective
nonconventionally, adverb
quasi-conventional, adjective
quasi-conventionally, adverb
semiconventional, adjective
semiconventionally, adverb


1. See formal1. 2. usual, habitual, customary.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
conventional (kənˈvɛnʃənəl)
 
adj
1.  following the accepted customs and proprieties, esp in a way that lacks originality: conventional habits
2.  established by accepted usage or general agreement
3.  of or relating to a convention or assembly
4.  law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
5.  arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
6.  (of weapons, warfare, etc) not nuclear
 
n
7.  bridge another word for convention
 
con'ventionally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

conventional
1580s, "of the nature of an agreement," from L. conventionalis "pertaining to convention or agreement," from conventionem (see convention). Meaning "of the nature of a convention" is from 1812, now rare; "established by social convention" is from 1761; that of "following
tradition" is from 1831; that of "non-nuclear" is from 1955. Realted: Conventionally.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
When language is conventionally used by writers it becomes burdened with
  clichés and dead phrases.
My conventionally beautiful but average sister attracts every awful egomaniac
  on the planet.
Since publications conventionally come at the end of a vita, committees are
  sure to look for them there.
Conventionally raised birds, on the other hand, are fed a strictly grain diet.
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