convention

[kuhn-ven-shuhn]
noun
1.
a meeting or formal assembly, as of representatives or delegates, for discussion of and action on particular matters of common concern.
2.
U.S. politics. a representative party assembly to nominate candidates and adopt platforms and party rules.
3.
an agreement, compact, or contract.
4.
an international agreement, especially one dealing with a specific matter, as postal service or copyright.
5.
a rule, method, or practice established by usage; custom: the convention of showing north at the top of a map.
6.
general agreement or consent; accepted usage, especially as a standard of procedure.
8.
Bridge. any of a variety of established systems or methods of bidding or playing that allows partners to convey certain information about their hands.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English convencio(u)n (< Middle French) < Latin conventiōn- (stem of conventiō) agreement, literally, a coming together. See convene, -tion

anticonvention, adjective
counterconvention, noun
postconvention, adjective
preconvention, noun
proconvention, adjective
unconvention, noun


1. Convention, assembly, conference, convocation name meetings for particular purposes. Convention usually suggests a meeting of delegates representing political, church, social, or fraternal organizations. Assembly usually implies a meeting for a settled or customary purpose, as for discussion, legislation, or participation in a social function. Conference suggests a meeting for consultation and discussion about business or professional problems. Convocation denotes a (church) assembly, the members of which have been summoned for a special purpose; chapel services at some colleges are called convocations. 3. pact, treaty.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
convention (kənˈvɛnʃən)
 
n
1.  a.  a large formal assembly of a group with common interests, such as a political party or trade union
 b.  the persons attending such an assembly
2.  (US) politics an assembly of delegates of one party to select candidates for office
3.  diplomacy an international agreement second only to a treaty in formality: a telecommunications convention
4.  any agreement, compact, or contract
5.  the most widely accepted or established view of what is thought to be proper behaviour, good taste, etc
6.  an accepted rule, usage, etc: a convention used by printers
7.  bridge Also called: conventional a bid or play not to be taken at its face value, which one's partner can interpret according to a prearranged bidding system
 
[C15: from Latin conventiō an assembling, agreeing]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

convention
c.1440, from L. conventionem (nom. conventio), pp. of convenire (see convene).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The process has four steps: the precinct caucuses, the county conventions, the
  district conventions and the state convention.
Finally, familiarize yourself with the conventions of various discussion
  formats within your discipline.
Every bit of past and future advancement rests on two things: technological
  protocols and social conventions.
That's because there are strict naming conventions for astronomical bodies.
Matching Quote
"... women are supposed to be unfit to vote because they are hysterical and emotional and of course men would not like to have emotion enter into a political campaign. They want to cut out all emotion and so they would like to cut us out. I had heard so much about our emotionalism that I went to the last Democratic national convention, held at Baltimore, to observe the calm repose of the male politicians. I saw some men take a picture of one gentleman whom they wanted elected and it was so big they had to walk sidewise as they carried it forward; they were followed by hundreds of other men screaming and yelling, shouting and singing the "Houn' Dawg".... I saw men jump up on the seats and throw their hats in the air and shout: "What's the matter with Champ Clark?" Then, when those hats came down, other men would kick them back into the air, shouting at the top of their voices: "He's all right!!"... No hysteria about it—just patriotic loyalty, splendid manly devotion to principle. And so they went on and on until 5 o'clock in the morning—the whole night long. I saw men jump up on their seats and jump down again and run around in a ring. I saw two men run towards another man to hug him both at once and they split his coat up the middle of his back and sent him spinning around like a wheel. All this with the perfect poise of the legal male mind in politics! I have been to many women's conventions in my day but I never saw a woman leap up on a chair and take off her bonnet and toss it up in the air and shout: "What's the matter with" somebody. I never saw a woman knock another woman's bonnet off her head as she screamed, "She's all right!".... But we are willing to admit that we are emotional. I have actually seen women stand up and wave their handkerchiefs. I have even seen them take hold of hands and sing, "Blest be the tie that binds." Nobody doubts that women are excitable."
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