convoys'

convoy

[v. kon-voi, kuhn-voi; n. kon-voi]
verb (used with object)
1.
to accompany or escort, usually for protection: A destroyer convoyed the merchant ship.
noun
2.
the act of convoying.
3.
the protection provided by an escort.
4.
a ship, fleet, group of vehicles, etc., accompanied by a protecting escort.
5.
an armed force, warship, etc., that escorts, especially for protection.
6.
any group of military vehicles traveling together under the same orders.
7.
Citizens Band Radio Slang. two or more CB-equipped vehicles traveling together.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English convoyen < Middle French convoier, Anglo-French conveier to convey

unconvoyed, adjective


1. See accompany.
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World English Dictionary
convoy (ˈkɒnvɔɪ)
 
n
1.  a group of merchant ships with an escort of warships
2.  a group of land vehicles assembled to travel together
3.  the act of travelling or escorting by convoy (esp in the phrase in convoy)
 
vb
4.  (tr) to escort while in transit
 
[C14: from Old French convoier to convey]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

convoy
late 14c. (as a verb), from O.Fr. convoier, from V.L. *conviare, lit. "go together on the road" (see convey). The noun first recorded 1550s, "the act of guiding or escorting for protection;" meaning "train of ships or wagons carrying munitions or provisions in wartime under
protection of escort" is from c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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