cooperage

[koo-per-ij, koop-er-]
noun
1.
the work or business of a cooper.
2.
the place where such work is carried on.
3.
articles made by a cooper, as barrels or casks.
4.
the price paid or charged for coopers' work.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English. See cooper, -age

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cooperage (ˈkuːpərɪdʒ)
 
n
1.  Also called: coopery the craft, place of work, or products of a cooper
2.  the labour fee charged by a cooper

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

cooperage

large, bulging cylindrical container of sturdy construction traditionally made from wooden staves and wooden or metal hoops. The term is also a unit of volume measure, specifically 31 gallons of a fermented or distilled beverage, or 42 gallons of a petroleum product. According to the 1st-century-AD Roman historian Pliny the Elder, the ancient craft of barrel making, also called cooperage, was invented by the inhabitants of the Alpine valleys.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Once the oak is seasoned, it goes to a factory called a cooperage to be made into barrels.
Sometimes his pieces resemble hybrids of basketry and cooperage.
As in white oak, the wood provides tight cooperage and was once widely used in making barrels and kegs.
Logging or occupations in the operations of any sawmill, lathe mill, shingle mill or cooperage.
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