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countenance

[koun-tn-uh ns] /ˈkaʊn tn əns/
noun
1.
appearance, especially the look or expression of the face:
a sad countenance.
2.
the face; visage.
3.
calm facial expression; composure.
4.
approval or favor; encouragement; moral support.
5.
Obsolete. bearing; behavior.
verb (used with object), countenanced, countenancing.
6.
to permit or tolerate:
You should not have countenanced his rudeness.
7.
to approve, support, or encourage.
Idioms
8.
out of countenance, visibly disconcerted; abashed:
He was somewhat out of countenance at the prospect of an apology.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English cuntenaunce behavior, bearing, self-control < Anglo-French cuntena(u)nce, Old French contenance < Latin continentia; see continence
Related forms
countenancer, noun
uncountenanced, adjective
undercountenance, noun
Synonyms
2. See face.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for countenancer

countenance

/ˈkaʊntɪnəns/
noun
1.
the face, esp when considered as expressing a person's character or mood a pleasant countenance
2.
support or encouragement; sanction
3.
composure; self-control (esp in the phrases keep or lose one's countenance; out of countenance)
verb (transitive)
4.
to support or encourage; sanction
5.
to tolerate; endure
Derived Forms
countenancer, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French contenance mien, behaviour, from Latin continentia restraint, control; see contain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for countenancer
countenance
mid-13c., from O.Fr. countenance "demeanor, bearing, conduct," from L. continentia "restraint," lit. "way one contains oneself," from continere (see contain). Meaning evolving M.E. from "appearance" to "facial expression betraying a state of mind," to "face" itself (late 14c.). The verb "to favor, patronize" is from 1560s, from notion of "to look upon with sanction or smiles."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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