countenance

[koun-tn-uhns]
noun
1.
appearance, especially the look or expression of the face: a sad countenance.
2.
the face; visage.
3.
calm facial expression; composure.
4.
approval or favor; encouragement; moral support.
5.
Obsolete. bearing; behavior.
verb (used with object), countenanced, countenancing.
6.
to permit or tolerate: You should not have countenanced his rudeness.
7.
to approve, support, or encourage.
Idioms
8.
out of countenance, visibly disconcerted; abashed: He was somewhat out of countenance at the prospect of an apology.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English cuntenaunce behavior, bearing, self-control < Anglo-French cuntena(u)nce, Old French contenance < Latin continentia; see continence

countenancer, noun
uncountenanced, adjective
undercountenance, noun


2. See face.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
countenance (ˈkaʊntɪnəns)
 
n
1.  the face, esp when considered as expressing a person's character or mood: a pleasant countenance
2.  support or encouragement; sanction
3.  composure; self-control (esp in the phrases keeporlose one's countenance; out of countenance)
 
vb
4.  to support or encourage; sanction
5.  to tolerate; endure
 
[C13: from Old French contenance mien, behaviour, from Latin continentia restraint, control; see contain]
 
'countenancer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

countenance
mid-13c., from O.Fr. countenance "demeanor, bearing, conduct," from L. continentia "restraint," lit. "way one contains oneself," from continere (see contain). Meaning evolving M.E. from "appearance" to "facial expression betraying a state of mind," to "face" itself (late
14c.). The verb "to favor, patronize" is from 1560s, from notion of "to look upon with sanction or smiles."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Small wonder, perhaps, in an age when jetlagged musicians played spaced-out works with tedium engraved on their countenances.
Some of our ancestors are clearly inferior to us, with smaller brains and apelike countenances.
But generally the old veterans wore cheerful countenances and were disposed to make merry.
The boys crowd around the office, and it is interesting to watch their countenances as they await the distribution of the mail.
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