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counterbalance

[n. koun-ter-bal-uh ns; v. koun-ter-bal-uh ns] /n. ˈkaʊn tərˌbæl əns; v. ˌkaʊn tərˈbæl əns/
noun
1.
a weight balancing another weight; an equal weight, power, or influence acting in opposition; counterpoise.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), counterbalanced, counterbalancing.
2.
to act against or oppose with an equal weight, force, or influence; offset.
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; counter- + balance
Related forms
uncounterbalanced, adjective
Synonyms
2. correct, countervail, rectify, balance.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for counterbalance
  • In fact, these factors may counterbalance or completely offset the negative consequences of the anxiety-related traits.
  • Point is, more greenhouse in the past was a convenient counterbalance against less solar energy.
  • Improving technologies set up a strange counterbalance for people with prothetic limbs.
  • His arms provide counterbalance, waving in controlled, tai-chi-style movements.
  • Identify supports on your journey that are strong enough to counterbalance the obstacles you face.
  • Markets have moods and biases and it falls to regulators to counterbalance them.
  • The arms stretch from the center to counterbalance the figure.
  • Compensating ropes may connect to the bottom of the car and the counterbalance weights.
British Dictionary definitions for counterbalance

counterbalance

noun (ˈkaʊntəˌbæləns)
1.
a weight or force that balances or offsets another
verb (transitive) (ˌkaʊntəˈbæləns)
2.
to act as a counterbalance
Also called counterpoise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for counterbalance
v.

1570s, from counter- + balance (v.), in reference to scales. Figurative use dates from 1630s. As a noun, from c.1600.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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