counterfeit

[koun-ter-fit]
adjective
1.
made in imitation so as to be passed off fraudulently or deceptively as genuine; not genuine; forged: counterfeit dollar bills.
2.
pretended; unreal: counterfeit grief.
noun
3.
an imitation intended to be passed off fraudulently or deceptively as genuine; forgery.
4.
Archaic. a copy.
5.
Archaic. a close likeness; portrait.
6.
Obsolete. impostor; pretender.
verb (used with object)
7.
to make a counterfeit of; imitate fraudulently; forge.
8.
to resemble.
9.
to simulate.
verb (used without object)
10.
to make counterfeits, as of money.
11.
to feign; dissemble.

Origin:
1250–1300; (adj.) Middle English countrefet false, forged < Anglo-French cuntrefet, Old French contrefait, past participle of conterfere to copy, imitate, equivalent to conter- counter- + fere to make, do ≪ Latin facere (see fact); (v.) Middle English countrefeten, verbal derivative of countrefet

counterfeiter, noun
counterfeitly, adverb
counterfeitness, noun
noncounterfeit, adjective
uncounterfeited, adjective


1. spurious, bogus. See false. 2. sham, feigned, simulated, fraudulent; mock, fake, ersatz. 3. falsification, sham. 7. copy; falsify.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
counterfeit (ˈkaʊntəfɪt)
 
adj
1.  made in imitation of something genuine with the intent to deceive or defraud; forged
2.  simulated; sham: counterfeit affection
 
n
3.  an imitation designed to deceive or defraud
4.  archaic an impostor; cheat
 
vb
5.  (tr) to make a fraudulent imitation of
6.  (intr) to make counterfeits
7.  to feign; simulate
8.  (tr) to imitate; copy
 
[C13: from Old French contrefait, from contrefaire to copy, from contre-counter- + faire to make, from Latin facere]
 
'counterfeiter
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

counterfeit
late 13c., from O.Fr. contrefait "imitated," pp. of contrefaire "imitate," from contre- "against" + faire "to make, to do" (from L. facere; see factitious). M.L. contrafactio meant "setting in opposition or contrast." The verb is from late 13c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

counterfeiting

manufacture of false money for gain, a kind of forgery in that something is copied so as to defraud by passing it for the original or genuine article. Because of the value conferred on money and the high level of technical skill required to imitate it, counterfeiting is singled out from other acts of forgery and is treated as a separate crime

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
It is this logic that explains the luxury sector's constant efforts to limit counterfeiting and copying.
Economic reverses in the region may yet sap demand, and counterfeiting could undermine confidence in the market.
There are horrid doubts: about consistency and about counterfeiting.
That, and counterfeiting, meant that the barter system has suffered hyperinflation.
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