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courser1

[kawr-ser, kohr-] /ˈkɔr sər, ˈkoʊr-/
noun
1.
a person or thing that courses.
2.
a dog for coursing.
Origin of courser1
1585-1595
1585-95; course + -er1

courser2

[kawr-ser, kohr-] /ˈkɔr sər, ˈkoʊr-/
noun, Literary.
1.
a swift horse.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French coursier < Vulgar Latin *cursārius, equivalent to Latin curs(us) course + -ārius -ary; see -er2

courser3

[kawr-ser, kohr-] /ˈkɔr sər, ˈkoʊr-/
noun
1.
any of several swift-footed, ploverlike birds of the genera Cursorius and Pluvianus, chiefly of the desert regions of Asia and Africa.
Origin
1760-70; irregular < New Latin cursōrius fitted for running, equivalent to Latin cur(rere) to run + -sōrius, for -tōrius -tory1; cf. course
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for courser
Historical Examples
  • And when he was upon his courser, and went to the castle, and entered into the cave, the dragon lift up her head against him.

  • Still the courser onward rushes, still his mighty heart supports him.

    Alroy Benjamin Disraeli
  • It was a high price for the horse, but the courser pleased the Franciscan, and the bargain was struck.

  • The jackal lapped the courser's blood, and moaned with exquisite delight.

    Alroy Benjamin Disraeli
  • At evening fall I chanced to ride,My courser to a tree I tied.

  • I have seen it, child; a rocky wilderness, where I would not let my courser graze.'

    Alroy Benjamin Disraeli
  • He therefore alighted from his courser, and the Jinnee said to him, “Drink of this spring.”

    Folk-Lore and Legends: Oriental Charles John Tibbitts
  • He rode like one insane, and his courser partook of his frenzy.

    Rookwood William Harrison Ainsworth
  • The Damsel he took in such gallant way, He lifted her up on his courser gray.

    Finnish Arts Anonymous
  • He reined up his courser on the summit and sadly viewed the scene.

    The Cavaliers of Virginia William A. Caruthers
British Dictionary definitions for courser

courser1

/ˈkɔːsə/
noun
1.
a person who courses hounds or dogs, esp greyhounds
2.
a hound or dog trained for coursing

courser2

/ˈkɔːsə/
noun
1.
(literary) a swift horse; steed
Word Origin
C13: from Old French coursier, from courscourse

courser3

/ˈkɔːsə/
noun
1.
a terrestrial plover-like shore bird, such as Cursorius cursor (cream-coloured courser), of the subfamily Cursoriinae of desert and semidesert regions of the Old World: family Glareolidae, order Charadriiformes
Word Origin
C18: from Latin cursōrius suited for running, from cursuscourse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for courser
n.

large, powerful horse," c.1300, from Old French corsier "fast horse, charger," literally "fast-running," from Vulgar Latin *cursarius, from Latin cursus (see course (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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