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covet

[kuhv-it] /ˈkʌv ɪt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to desire wrongfully, inordinately, or without due regard for the rights of others:
to covet another's property.
2.
to wish for, especially eagerly:
He won the prize they all coveted.
verb (used without object)
3.
to have an inordinate or wrongful desire.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English coveiten < Anglo-French coveiter, Old French coveit(i)er < Vulgar Latin *cupidiētāre, verbal derivative of *cupidiētās, for Latin cupititās cupidity
Related forms
covetable, adjective
coveter, noun
covetingly, adverb
uncoveted, adjective
uncoveting, adjective
Synonyms
1. See envy.
Antonyms
1. renounce.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for covet
  • He brings a charisma and a consumer attraction that marketers covet.
  • After all, when the wealth is flowing, people don't covet the concerts you see or the books you read.
  • And they mostly covet expensive watches, which are easily hidden and sometimes traded for cash.
  • Because of their scale and broad range of unique properties, biologists covet their use.
  • In turn, many hunters covet road hunting as the one guaranteed option of having access to public hunting opportunities.
  • Teaching time is a distinctly personal investment for teachers and they tend to covet it.
  • Local governments, however, do not covet the existing authority for reducing water demands.
British Dictionary definitions for covet

covet

/ˈkʌvɪt/
verb (transitive) -vets, -veting, -veted
1.
to wish, long, or crave for (something, esp the property of another person)
Derived Forms
covetable, adjective
coveter, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French coveitier, from coveitié eager desire, ultimately from Latin cupiditācupidity
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for covet
v.

mid-13c., from Old French coveitier "covet, desire, lust after" (12c., Modern French convoiter, influenced by con- words), probably ultimately from Latin cupiditas "passionate desire, eagerness, ambition," from cupidus "very desirous," from cupere "long for, desire" (see cupidity). Related: Coveted; coveting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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