coyish

coy

[koi]
adjective, coyer, coyest.
1.
artfully or affectedly shy or reserved; slyly hesitant; coquettish.
2.
shy; modest.
3.
showing reluctance, especially when insincere or affected, to reveal one's plans or opinions, make a commitment, or take a stand: The mayor was coy about his future political aspirations.
4.
Archaic. disdainful; aloof.
5.
Obsolete. quiet; reserved.
verb (used without object)
6.
Archaic. to act in a coy manner.
verb (used with object) Obsolete.
7.
to quiet; soothe.
8.
to pat; caress.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French coi, quoy calm, Old French quei < Vulgar Latin *quētus, for Latin quiētus quiet

coyish, adjective
coyishness, noun
coyly, adverb
coyness, noun
overcoy, adjective
overcoyly, adverb
overcoyness, noun
uncoy, adjective
uncoyly, adverb
uncoyness, noun


2. retiring, diffident, bashful, demure.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
coy (kɔɪ)
 
adj
1.  (usually of a woman) affectedly demure, esp in a playful or provocative manner
2.  shy; modest
3.  evasive, esp in an annoying way
 
[C14: from Old French coi reserved, from Latin quiētusquiet]
 
'coyish
 
adj
 
'coyly
 
adv
 
'coyness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

coy
early 14c., from O.Fr. coi, earlier quei "quiet, still," ultimately from L. quietus "resting, at rest" (see quiet). Meaning "shy" emerged 14c. Meaning "unwilling to commit" is 1961.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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