crambo

[kram-boh]
noun, plural cramboes.
1.
a game in which one person or side must find a rhyme to a word or a line of verse given by another.
2.
inferior rhyme.

Origin:
1600–10; earlier crambe < Latin crambē repetīta phrase used by Juvenal in reference to unimaginative writing, literally, repeated (i.e., re-served) cabbage (< Greek krambē kind of cabbage)

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World English Dictionary
crambo (ˈkræmbəʊ)
 
n
a word game in which one team says a rhyme or rhyming line for a word or line given by the other team
 
[C17: from earlier crambe, probably from Latin crambē repetīta cabbage repeated, hence an old story, a rhyming game, from Greek krambē]

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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

crambo

a game in which one player gave a word or line of verse to be matched in rhyme by other players. Thus, one said, "I know a word that rhymes with bird." A second asked, "Is it ridiculous?" "No, it is not absurd." "Is it a part of speech?" "No, it is not a word." This proceeded until the right word was guessed. Under the name of the ABC of Aristotle, crambo reportedly was played in England as early as the 14th century. It is frequently mentioned in the literature of the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences for crambo
He found enjoyment in playing the intellectual rhyming game crambo with his peers.
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