cram

[kram]
verb (used with object), crammed, cramming.
1.
to fill (something) by force with more than it can easily hold.
2.
to force or stuff (usually followed by into, down, etc.).
3.
to fill with or as with an excessive amount of food; overfeed.
4.
Informal.
a.
to prepare (a person), as for an examination, by having him or her memorize information within a short period of time.
b.
to acquire knowledge of (a subject) by so preparing oneself.
5.
Archaic. to tell lies to.
verb (used without object), crammed, cramming.
6.
to eat greedily or to excess.
7.
to study for an examination by memorizing facts at the last minute.
8.
to press or force accommodation in a room, vehicle, etc., beyond normal or comfortable capacity; crowd; jam: The whole team crammed into the bus.
noun
9.
Informal. the act of cramming for an examination.
10.
a crammed state.
11.
a dense crowd; throng.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English crammen, Old English crammian to stuff, akin to crimman to put in

crammingly, adverb
well-crammed, adjective


1. crowd, pack, squeeze, compress, overcrowd. 3. glut. 6. gorge.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
cram (kræm)
 
vb , crams, cramming, crammed
1.  (tr) to force (people, material, etc) into (a room, container, etc) with more than it can hold; stuff
2.  to eat or cause to eat more than necessary
3.  informal to study or cause to study (facts, etc), esp for an examination, by hastily memorizing
 
n
4.  the act or condition of cramming
5.  a crush
 
[Old English crammian; related to Old Norse kremja to press]

Cram (kræm)
 
n
Steve. born 1960, English middle-distance runner: European 1500 m champion (1981, 1986); world 1500 m champion (1983)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cram
O.E. crammian "press something into something else," from P.Gmc. base *kram-/*krem-. Meaning "study intensely for an exam" is British student slang first recorded 1803.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

cram definition


  1. in.
    to study hard at the last minute for a test. : If you would study all the time, you wouldn't need to cram.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Example sentences
The riders started cramming into the bus even though it wasn't leaving yet.
Forget those days of cramming into a small hotel room.
High-school and college teachers always entreat their charges to forgo the
  cramming.
Office buildings are cramming more people into existing floors, but the
  increased population can slow elevator service.
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