creak

[kreek]
verb (used without object)
1.
to make a sharp, harsh, grating, or squeaking sound.
2.
to move with creaking.
verb (used with object)
3.
to cause to creak.
noun
4.
a creaking sound.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English creken to croak, apparently back formation from Old English crǣcettan, variant of crācettan to croak

creakingly, adverb

creak, creek, croak.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
creak (kriːk)
 
vb
1.  to make or cause to make a harsh squeaking sound
2.  (intr) to make such sounds while moving: the old car creaked along
 
n
3.  a harsh squeaking sound
 
[C14: variant of croak, of imitative origin]
 
'creaky
 
adj
 
'creakily
 
adv
 
'creakiness
 
n
 
'creakingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

creak
early 14c., "utter a harsh cry," of imitative origin. Used of the sound made by a rusty gate hinge, etc., from 1580s. Related: Creaky (1834).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As you get older your bones start to creak when it gets cold.
Now the objects in your room-the bed lamps, the clock, the shutters-begin to
  rattle and creak in perfect rhythm.
She did not shift her feet during the recital-perhaps because the old wooden
  floor planks could creak loudly.
They stop at a partly hidden door, turn the key and push it open with an
  appropriately spooky creak.
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