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[krok-it] /ˈkrɒk ɪt/
noun, Architecture
a medieval ornament, usually in the form of a leaf that curves up and away from the supporting surface and returns partially upon itself.
Origin of crocket
1300-50; Middle English croket hook < Anglo-French, equivalent to croc hook (< Germanic; see crook1) + -et -et. See crochet, crotchet Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for crocket
Historical Examples
  • He was sojourning at Mrs. crocket's, and had been there for the last two days.

    He Knew He Was Right Anthony Trollope
  • Mrs. crocket will see about having somebody to take care of the house.

    He Knew He Was Right Anthony Trollope
  • There have been times when we should have gone to bed very hungry if it had not been for Mrs. crocket.

    He Knew He Was Right Anthony Trollope
  • I spoke to Mrs. crocket yesterday about a cart for moving the things.

    He Knew He Was Right Anthony Trollope
  • Mrs. crocket's boy, though he was only about three feet high, was a miracle of skill and discretion.

    He Knew He Was Right Anthony Trollope
  • Of such lambent ornament, the most important piece is the crocket, of which I rapidly set before you the origin.

    Val d'Arno John Ruskin
  • crocket, detached flowers or bunches of foliage, used to decorate the angles of spires, pinnacles and gables.

  • crocket—an ornament usually resembling a leaf half opened, and projecting from the upper edge of a canopy or pyramidal covering.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys Dugald Butler and Herbert Story
  • The crocket was also introduced as a new feature in this style.

  • So they had called at the Stag and Antlers, and Mrs. crocket had told them her mind upon several matters.

    He Knew He Was Right Anthony Trollope
British Dictionary definitions for crocket


a carved ornament in the form of a curled leaf or cusp, used in Gothic architecture Also called crochet
Word Origin
C17: from Anglo-French croket a little hook, from croc hook, of Scandinavian origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crocket

c.1300, "curl of hair," from Anglo-French crocket, from northern French form of French crochet (see crochet). Meaning "ornamental device on a Gothic pediment" is from late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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