crocodiloid

crocodile

[krok-uh-dahyl]
noun
1.
any of several crocodilians of the genus Crocodylus, found in sluggish waters and swamps of the tropics.
2.
any reptile of the order Crocodylia; crocodilian.
3.
the tanned skin or hide of these animals, used in the manufacture of luggage and accessories, as belts, shoes, and wallets.
4.
Chiefly British. a file of people, especially schoolchildren, out for a walk.
5.
Archaic. a person who makes a hypocritical show of sorrow.

Origin:
1250–1300; < Latin crocodīlus < Greek krokódeilos crocodile, originally a kind of lizard, said to be equivalent to krók(ē) pebble + -o- -o- + drîlos, dreîlos worm (though attested only in sense “penis”), with r lost by dissimilation replacing Middle English cocodrille < Medieval Latin cocodrilus

crocodiloid [krok-uh-dil-oid, krok-uh-dahy-loid] , adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
crocodile (ˈkrɒkəˌdaɪl)
 
n
1.  any large tropical reptile, such as C. niloticus (African crocodile), of the family Crocodylidae: order Crocodilia (crocodilians). They have a broad head, tapering snout, massive jaws, and a thick outer covering of bony plates
2.  any other reptile of the order Crocodilia; a crocodilian
3.  a.  leather made from the skin of any of these animals
 b.  (as modifier): crocodile shoes
4.  informal (Brit) a line of people, esp schoolchildren, walking two by two
 
[C13: via Old French, from Latin crocodīlus, from Greek krokodeilos lizard, ultimately from krokē pebble + drilos worm; referring to its fondness for basking on shingle]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

crocodile
1560s, restored spelling of M.E. cocodrille (c.1300), from M.L. cocodrillus, from L. crocodilus, from Gk. krokodilos, word applied by Herodotus to the crocodile of the Nile, apparently due to its basking habits, from kroke "pebbles" + drilos "worm." The crocodile tears story was in English from at least
c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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