crossover-voter

crossover

[kraws-oh-ver, kros-]
noun
1.
a bridge or other structure for crossing over a river, highway, etc.
2.
Genetics.
b.
a genotype resulting from crossing over.
3.
Popular Music.
a.
the act of crossing over in style, usually with the intention of broadening the commercial appeal to a wider audience.
b.
music that crosses over in style, occasionally sharing attributes with several musical styles and therefore often appealing to a broader audience.
4.
Also called crossover voter. U.S. politics. a member of one political party who votes for the candidate of another party in a primary.
6.
Railroads. a track structure composed of two or more turnouts, permitting movement of cars from either of two parallel and adjacent tracks to the other.
7.
Dance.
a.
a step in which dancers exchange places.
b.
a step involving partners in which the woman moves from one side of her partner to the other, crossing in front of him.
8.
Bowling. a ball that strikes the side of the head pin opposite to the bowling hand of the bowler.
9.
(in plumbing) a U -shaped pipe for bypassing another pipe.

Origin:
1785–95; noun use of verb phrase cross over

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
crossover (ˈkrɒsˌəʊvə)
 
n
1.  a place at which a crossing is made
2.  genetics
 a.  another term for crossing over
 b.  a chromosomal structure or character resulting from crossing over
3.  railways a point of transfer between two main lines
4.  short for crossover network
5.  a recording, book, or other product that becomes popular in a genre other than its own
 
adj
6.  (of music, fashion, art, etc) combining two distinct styles
7.  (of a performer, writer, recording, book, etc) having become popular in more than one genre

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

crossover
1795, as a term in textiles, from cross (adj.) + over. General use is from 1893; specifically of musicians and genres from 1970s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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