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[kuhl-cher-uh l] /ˈkʌl tʃər əl/
of or relating to culture or cultivation.
Origin of cultural
1865-70; culture + -al1
Related forms
culturally, adverb
anticultural, adjective
anticulturally, adverb
de-cultural, adjective
noncultural, adjective
nonculturally, adverb
precultural, adjective
preculturally, adverb
pseudocultural, adjective
pseudoculturally, adverb
transcultural, adjective
transculturally, adverb Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for cultural
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The economic interest goes with men through life, and it goes with the race throughout its process of cultural development.

  • Evolution of language, as well as of logic, belongs to cultural evolution.

  • How do the peoples of the given area divide themselves as cultural beings?

    Language Edward Sapir
  • This aspect constitutes more than a cultural or memetic issue.

  • It remains an artistic and cultural center, and some of its fine examples of Bulgarian renaissance architecture have survived.

    Area Handbook for Bulgaria Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole
British Dictionary definitions for cultural


of or relating to artistic or social pursuits or events considered to be valuable or enlightened
of or relating to a culture or civilization
(of certain varieties of plant) obtained by specialized breeding
Derived Forms
culturally, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cultural

1868, in reference to the raising of plants or animals, from Latin cultura "tillage" (see culture) + -al (1). In reference to the cultivation of the mind, from 1875; hence, "relating to civilization or a civilization." A fertile starter-word among anthropologists and sociologists: e.g. cultural diffusion, in use by 1912; cultural diversity by 1935; cultural imperialism by 1937; cultural pluralism by 1932; cultural relativism by 1948.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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