curule chair

curule chair

noun
(in ancient Rome) a folding seat with curved legs and no back, often ornamented with ivory, used only by certain high officials.

Origin:
1775–85

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To curule chair
Collins
World English Dictionary
curule chair
 
n
an upholstered folding seat with curved legs used by the highest civil officials of ancient Rome

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

curule chair

a style of chair reserved in ancient Rome for the use of the highest government dignitaries and usually made like a campstool with curved legs. Ordinarily made of ivory, with or without arms, it probably derived its name from the chariot (currus) in which a magistrate was conveyed to a place of judgment; it served early as a seat of judgment. Subsequently it became a sign of office of all higher ("curule") magistrates, or officials, including the consul, praetor, curule aedile (see aedile), dictator, master of the horse, interrex, censor, and, later, the emperor.

Learn more about curule chair with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;