follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: Novels For Language Lovers

cywydd

[kuh-with] /ˈkʌ wɪð/
noun, Prosody
1.
a form of meter in Welsh poetry consisting of rhyming couplets, each line having seven syllables: first used in the 14th century.
Origin
1950-1955
1950-55; < Welsh; Old Welsh couid song, metrical composition; cognate with Old Irish cubaid harmonious, rhyming
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Article for cywydd

Welsh verse form, a kind of short ode in rhyming couplets in which one rhyme is accented and the other unaccented; each line is composed of seven syllables and contains some form of cynghanedd (a complex system of alliteration and internal rhyme). Developed in the 14th century in south Wales by Dafydd ap Gwilym, the cywydd shows affinities with forms used by the earlier bardd teulu ("bard of the [king's] war band"), the second grade in the Welsh bardic system, and with those of the French trouveres and jongleurs. It was the leading Welsh verse form from the 14th to the early 17th century; its golden age was from the mid-14th to the mid-15th century, and its silver age, when excessive concern with stylistic rules hampered free poetic expression, from about 1500 to 1650. It was revived, with other bardic forms, by the classical school of Welsh poets in the mid-18th century, and again in the 19th century. It remains in use by those modern Welsh poets who prefer strict (i.e., classical) forms to the free metres that are derived from Welsh folk song and from English verse.

Learn more about cywydd with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for cywydd

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for cywydd

0
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for cywydd