czardas

czardas

[chahr-dahsh]
noun
a Hungarian national dance in two movements, one slow and the other fast.
Also, csardas.


Origin:
1855–60; < Hungarian csárdás, equivalent to csárda wayside tavern (< Serbo-Croatian čcȁrdāk orig., watchtower < Turkish < Persian chārtāk four-cornered room; čār four + tāk vault) + -s adj. suffix; earlier csárdák was analyzed as csárda + -k plural suffix

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World English Dictionary
czardas (ˈtʃɑːdæʃ)
 
n
1.  a Hungarian national dance of alternating slow and fast sections
2.  a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
 
[from Hungarian csárdás]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

czardas

national dance of Hungary. A courting dance for couples, it begins with a slow section (lassu), followed by an exhilarating fast section (friss). The individual dancers carry themselves proudly and improvise on a simple fundamental step, their feet snapping inward and outward, the couples whirling. The music, often played by a Gypsy orchestra, is in 24 or 44 time with compelling, syncopated rhythms. The czardas developed in the 19th century from an earlier folk dance, the magyar kor. A ballroom dance adapted from the czardas is popular in eastern Europe. A theatrical czardas with complicated Slavic and Hungarian folk-dance steps appears in ballet, as in Leo Delibes's Coppelia. Franz Liszt, in his Hungarian Rhapsodies, wrote music reminiscent of the czardas.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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