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deduct

[dih-duhkt] /dɪˈdʌkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to take away, as from a sum or amount:
Once you deduct your expenses, there is nothing left.
verb (used without object)
2.
detract; abate (usually followed by from):
The rocky soil deducts from the value of his property.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin dēductus brought down, withdrawn, past participle of dēdūcere; see deduce
Related forms
prededuct, verb (used with object)
undeducted, adjective
Can be confused
deduce, deduct.
Synonyms
1. See subtract.
Antonyms
add.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for de-duct

deduct

/dɪˈdʌkt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to take away or subtract (a number, quantity, part, etc): income tax is deducted from one's wages
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dēductus, past participle of dēdūcere to deduce
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for de-duct

deduct

v.

early 15c., from Latin deductus, past participle of deducere "lead down, bring away;" see deduce, with which it formerly was interchangeable. Technically, deduct refers to taking away portions or amounts; subtract to taking away numbers. Related: Deducted; deducting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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