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employ

[em-ploi] /ɛmˈplɔɪ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to hire or engage the services of (a person or persons); provide employment for; have or keep in one's service:
This factory employs thousands of people.
2.
to keep busy or at work; engage the attentions of:
He employs himself by reading after work.
3.
to make use of (an instrument, means, etc.); use; apply:
to employ a hammer to drive a nail.
4.
to occupy or devote (time, energies, etc.):
I employ my spare time in reading. I employ all my energies in writing.
noun
5.
employment; service:
to be in someone's employ.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English employen < Anglo-French, Middle French emploierLatin implicāre to enfold (Late Latin: to engage); see implicate
Related forms
de-employed, adjective
nonemploying, adjective
overemploy, verb (used with object)
preemploy, verb (used with object)
reemploy, verb (used with object)
well-employed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for de-employed

employ

/ɪmˈplɔɪ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to engage or make use of the services of (a person) in return for money; hire
2.
to provide work or occupation for; keep busy; occupy: collecting stamps employs a lot of his time
3.
to use as a means: to employ secret measures to get one's ends
noun
4.
the state of being employed (esp in the phrase in someone's employ)
Derived Forms
employable, adjective
employability, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Old French emploier, from Latin implicāre to entangle, engage, from plicāre to fold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for de-employed

employ

v.

early 15c., from Middle French employer, from Old French emploiier (12c.) "make use of, apply; increase; entangle; devote," from Latin implicare "enfold, involve, be connected with," from in- (see in- (2)) + plicare "to fold" (see ply (v.1)).

Sense of "hire, engage" first recorded in English 1580s, from "involve in a particular purpose," a sense which arose in Late Latin. Related: Employed; employing. The noun is 1660s, from French emploi. Imply, which is the same word, retains more of the original sense.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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