de-expropriation

expropriate

[eks-proh-pree-eyt]
verb (used with object), expropriated, expropriating.
1.
to take possession of, especially for public use by the right of eminent domain, thus divesting the title of the private owner: The government expropriated the land for a recreation area.
2.
to dispossess (a person) of ownership: The revolutionary government expropriated the landowners from their estates.
3.
to take (something) from another's possession for one's own use: He expropriated my ideas for his own article.

Origin:
1605–15; < Medieval Latin expropriātus separated from one's own (past participle of expropriāre), equivalent to ex- ex-1 + propri(āre) to appropriate (derivative of proprius proper) + -ātus -ate1

expropriable [eks-proh-pree-uh-buhl] , adjective
expropriation, noun
expropriationist, adjective, noun
expropriator, noun
de-expropriation, noun
unexpropriable, adjective
unexpropriated, adjective

appropriate, apropos, expropriate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
expropriate (ɛksˈprəʊprɪˌeɪt)
 
vb
See also eminent domain to deprive (an owner) of (property), esp by taking it for public use
 
[C17: from Medieval Latin expropriāre to deprive of possessions, from proprius own]
 
ex'propriable
 
adj
 
expropri'ation
 
n
 
ex'propriator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

expropriate
1610s, back formation from expropriation. Related: Expropriated; expropriating.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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