De-rail

derail

[dee-reyl]
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause (a train, streetcar, etc.) to run off the rails of a track.
2.
to cause to fail or become deflected from a purpose; reduce or delay the chances for success or development of: Being drafted into the army derailed his career for two years.
verb (used without object)
3.
(of a train, streetcar, etc.) to run off the rails of a track.
4.
to become derailed; go astray.
noun
5.
a track device for derailing rolling stock in an emergency.

Origin:
1840–50; < French dérailler, equivalent to dé- dis-1 + -railler, verbal derivative of rail rail1 (< E)

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
derail (dɪˈreɪl)
 
vb
1.  to go or cause to go off the rails, as a train, tram, etc
 
n
2.  chiefly (US) Also called: derailer a device designed to make rolling stock or locomotives leave the rails to avoid a collision or accident
 
de'railment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

derail
1850, in both trans. and intrans. senses, from Fr. dérailler "to go off the rails," from de- + railler (see rail). In general use first in U.S.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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