debris

[duh-bree, dey-bree or, esp. British, deb-ree]
noun
1.
the remains of anything broken down or destroyed; ruins; rubble: the debris of buildings after an air raid.
2.
Geology. an accumulation of loose fragments of rock.
Also, débris.


Origin:
1700–10; < French débris, Middle French debris, derivative of debriser to break up (in pieces), Old French debrisier (de- de- + brisier to break; see bruise)


1. detritus, litter, trash.
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World English Dictionary
debris or débris (ˈdeɪbrɪ, ˈdɛbrɪ, ˈdeɪbrɪ, ˈdɛbrɪ)
 
n
1.  fragments or remnants of something destroyed or broken; rubble
2.  a collection of loose material derived from rocks, or an accumulation of animal or vegetable matter
 
[C18: from French, from obsolete debrisier to break into pieces, from bruisier to shatter, of Celtic origin]
 
débris or débris
 
n
 
[C18: from French, from obsolete debrisier to break into pieces, from bruisier to shatter, of Celtic origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

debris
1708, from Fr. debriser "break down, crush," from O.Fr. briser "to break," from L.L. brisare, possibly of Gaulish origin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Wind and debris lash the side of the van.
The amount of space debris jumped just a few months ago when two satellites
  collided over Siberia.
Do a thorough fall cleanup and remove all debris from the ground below trees.
Most of the women in this collection are sifting carefully through the debris
  of failed relationships with flaky men.
Images for debris
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