follow Dictionary.com

Do you know ghouls from goblins and ghosts?

deceive

[dih-seev] /dɪˈsiv/
verb (used with object), deceived, deceiving.
1.
to mislead by a false appearance or statement; delude:
They deceived the enemy by disguising the destroyer as a freighter.
2.
to be unfaithful to (one's spouse or lover).
3.
Archaic. to while away (time).
verb (used without object), deceived, deceiving.
4.
to mislead or falsely persuade others; practice deceit:
an engaging manner that easily deceives.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English deceiven < Old French deceivre < Latin dēcipere, literally, to ensnare, equivalent to dē- de- + -cipere, combining form of capere to take
Related forms
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceivably, adverb
deceiver, noun
deceivingly, adverb
interdeceive, verb, interdeceived, interdeceiving.
nondeceiving, adjective
predeceive, verb (used with object), predeceived, predeceiving.
predeceiver, noun
redeceive, verb (used with object), redeceived, redeceiving.
well-deceived, adjective
Synonyms
1. cozen, dupe, fool, gull, hoodwink, trick, defraud, outwit, entrap, ensnare, betray. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for deceive
  • Illegal products deceive the consumer and displace legitimate sales.
  • In timing a short event, your eyes may deceive your ears.
  • There is no intention to deceive.
  • That looks like a deliberate attempt to deceive.
  • But, the penalty for intentionally trying to deceive their customers when they are required to be open should be severe.
  • It looks like a routine election, but appearances deceive.
  • Sonar images can deceive even those who interpret them for a living.
  • Do not continue to deceive yourself and attempt to deceive this District.
  • He admitted that he engaged in conduct designed to deceive the investigation.
  • Our green instincts often deceive us.
British Dictionary definitions for deceive

deceive

/dɪˈsiːv/
verb (transitive)
1.
to mislead by deliberate misrepresentation or lies
2.
to delude (oneself)
3.
to be unfaithful to (one's sexual partner)
4.
(archaic) to disappoint: his hopes were deceived
Derived Forms
deceivable, adjective
deceivably, adverb
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceiver, noun
deceiving, noun, adjective
deceivingly, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old French deceivre, from Latin dēcipere to ensnare, cheat, from capere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for deceive
v.

c.1300, from Old French decevoir (12c., Modern French décevoir) "to deceive," from Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de- "from" or pejorative + capere "to take" (see capable). Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for deceive

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for deceive

13
15
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with deceive

Nearby words for deceive