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deceive

[dih-seev] /dɪˈsiv/
verb (used with object), deceived, deceiving.
1.
to mislead by a false appearance or statement; delude:
They deceived the enemy by disguising the destroyer as a freighter.
2.
to be unfaithful to (one's spouse or lover).
3.
Archaic. to while away (time).
verb (used without object), deceived, deceiving.
4.
to mislead or falsely persuade others; practice deceit:
an engaging manner that easily deceives.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English deceiven < Old French deceivre < Latin dēcipere, literally, to ensnare, equivalent to dē- de- + -cipere, combining form of capere to take
Related forms
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceivably, adverb
deceiver, noun
deceivingly, adverb
interdeceive, verb, interdeceived, interdeceiving.
nondeceiving, adjective
predeceive, verb (used with object), predeceived, predeceiving.
predeceiver, noun
redeceive, verb (used with object), redeceived, redeceiving.
well-deceived, adjective
Synonyms
1. cozen, dupe, fool, gull, hoodwink, trick, defraud, outwit, entrap, ensnare, betray. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for deceived
  • He appears to have deceived himself by the use of the word scientific as applied to the natural scale.
  • We felt deceived by his overstatement of his academic expertise.
  • For one thing, he clearly deceived the public about how severe were his medical problems.
  • His glum, deceived heroes are not tired of life, they are tired of spying.
  • Many people come to believe it, but they are all deceived by a common source.
  • He has deceived even the well-meaning in the sciences.
  • Bill confronts his father about lying to his fiancee, but finds out that he is the one that's actually been deceived.
  • He knows he is being deceived, and he complains about it.
  • deceived though he was on this occasion, he had a gift for identifying the great historical developments of the day.
  • These were the people who had led the race, and it was as if they had been deceived, suddenly abandoned to chance.
British Dictionary definitions for deceived

deceive

/dɪˈsiːv/
verb (transitive)
1.
to mislead by deliberate misrepresentation or lies
2.
to delude (oneself)
3.
to be unfaithful to (one's sexual partner)
4.
(archaic) to disappoint: his hopes were deceived
Derived Forms
deceivable, adjective
deceivably, adverb
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceiver, noun
deceiving, noun, adjective
deceivingly, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old French deceivre, from Latin dēcipere to ensnare, cheat, from capere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deceived

deceive

v.

c.1300, from Old French decevoir (12c., Modern French décevoir) "to deceive," from Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de- "from" or pejorative + capere "to take" (see capable). Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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