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deceive

[dih-seev] /dɪˈsiv/
verb (used with object), deceived, deceiving.
1.
to mislead by a false appearance or statement; delude:
They deceived the enemy by disguising the destroyer as a freighter.
2.
to be unfaithful to (one's spouse or lover).
3.
Archaic. to while away (time).
verb (used without object), deceived, deceiving.
4.
to mislead or falsely persuade others; practice deceit:
an engaging manner that easily deceives.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English deceiven < Old French deceivre < Latin dēcipere, literally, to ensnare, equivalent to dē- de- + -cipere, combining form of capere to take
Related forms
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceivably, adverb
deceiver, noun
deceivingly, adverb
interdeceive, verb, interdeceived, interdeceiving.
nondeceiving, adjective
predeceive, verb (used with object), predeceived, predeceiving.
predeceiver, noun
redeceive, verb (used with object), redeceived, redeceiving.
well-deceived, adjective
Synonyms
1. cozen, dupe, fool, gull, hoodwink, trick, defraud, outwit, entrap, ensnare, betray. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for deceives
  • Even computer chess, in which seeming progress has been made, deceives.
  • His activities are altogether harmless and are almost excused by the comic lowness of those he deceives.
  • It seems that this life of objects deceives their immobility.
  • Engineers shall avoid all conduct or practice that deceives the public.
  • Meanwhile, lots of philosophers have said that the material reality as it appears to you actually deceives.
  • The focus is on the dupe's deception rather than on the hypocrite who deceives him.
  • Having the better brands on its lists simply deceives the customer into thinking there is a real choice here.
  • Outlines the long history and the dangers of doublespeak--language that misleads, distorts, and deceives.
  • Allowing individuals, other than parents to consent to this decision, deceives and denies a parents right to be involved.
  • Fraud occurs when an individual or organization deliberately deceives others in order to gain some sort of unauthorized benefit.
British Dictionary definitions for deceives

deceive

/dɪˈsiːv/
verb (transitive)
1.
to mislead by deliberate misrepresentation or lies
2.
to delude (oneself)
3.
to be unfaithful to (one's sexual partner)
4.
(archaic) to disappoint: his hopes were deceived
Derived Forms
deceivable, adjective
deceivably, adverb
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceiver, noun
deceiving, noun, adjective
deceivingly, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old French deceivre, from Latin dēcipere to ensnare, cheat, from capere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deceives

deceive

v.

c.1300, from Old French decevoir (12c., Modern French décevoir) "to deceive," from Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de- "from" or pejorative + capere "to take" (see capable). Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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