deception

[dih-sep-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of deceiving; the state of being deceived.
2.
something that deceives or is intended to deceive; fraud; artifice.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English decepcioun < Old French < Late Latin dēceptiōn- (stem of dēceptiō), equivalent to Latin dēcept(us) (past participle of dēcipere; see deceive) + -iōn- -ion

nondeception, noun
predeception, noun


2. trick, stratagem, ruse, wile, hoax, imposture.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
deception (dɪˈsɛpʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of deceiving or the state of being deceived
2.  something that deceives; trick

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

deception
early 15c., from pp. stem of L. decipere (see deceive).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Whether these are errors or deceptions, the candidate can be harmed.
Deceptions, if discovered, will likely cause your candidacy to be summarily
  rejected.
There are always new layers of knowledge to be uncovered, deceptions to be
  overcome, and coherencies to grasp.
We needed, every hour, to understand that the fabric of routine covered unseen
  deceptions and enormities.
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